How to Motivate Children’s Academic Achievement: What the Studies Say

Based on the findings of a study, for children aged 9-10 years, parental encouragement of children’s pleasure and engagement in a task as personal growth and learning is positively associated with children’s intellectual intrinsic motivation (motivation comes from internal factors, such as feeling good or feeling happy doing it, as opposed to extrinsic motivation in which the drive of motivation is from external factors such as doing things in order to get rewards). On the contrary, usage of external rewards or provision of rewards after the completion of a task can dampen children’s intrinsic motivation. Furthermore, parenting styles of motivation at an early age (such as when the child is aged 9) determines children’s intrinsic academic motivation and achievement at age 10. 

In addition, based on the findings of 4 studies, it is important to know that intellectual intrinsic motivation in the prior year (such as when the child is aged 8 years) is positively associated with and predicts children’s academic achievement in the subsequent year (such as when the child is aged 9 years). On the contrary, extrinsic motivation is associated with poor academic performance.

Created on December 06 2015 at 12: 28 AM


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Details of Scientific Answers: Click on each bullet to Read References

References:

1: "Role of parental motivational practices in children's academic intrinsic motivation and achievement," Journal of Educational Psychology, 1994, by Gottfried, A. E., Fleming, J. S., & Gottfried, A. W. . (Citations: 282).



References:

1: "Academic intrinsic motivation in elementary and junior high school students," Journal of educational psychology, 2005, by Gottfried, A. E. . (Citations: 721).



2: "Intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations in the classroom: age differences and academic correlates," Journal of educational psychology, 2005, by Lepper, M. R., Corpus, J. H., & Iyengar, S. S. . (Citations: 721).



3: "Role of parental motivational practices in children's academic intrinsic motivation and achievement," Journal of Educational Psychology, 1994, by Gottfried, A. E., Fleming, J. S., & Gottfried, A. W. . (Citations: 282).



4: "Within-year changes in children’s intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations: Contextual predictors and academic outcomes," Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2009, by Corpus, J. H., McClintic-Gilbert, M. S., & Hayenga, A. O. . (Citations: 119).



5: "Intrinsic intellectuality: Its relations to social class, intelligence, and achievement," Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1984, by Lloyd, J., & Barenblatt, L. . (Citations: 95).



References:

1: "Intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations in the classroom: age differences and academic correlates," Journal of educational psychology, 2005, by Lepper, M. R., Corpus, J. H., & Iyengar, S. S. . (Citations: 721).



2: "Within-year changes in children’s intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations: Contextual predictors and academic outcomes," Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2009, by Corpus, J. H., McClintic-Gilbert, M. S., & Hayenga, A. O. . (Citations: 119).




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